Spurn Lighthouse

_dsc8643-576x1280Something I didn’t mention yesterday was that the lighthouse at Spurn has now been restored and opened to the public. It’s well worth a visit for the views, as I’ll share here.It’s easy to focus on the nature of Spurn and ignore the rest of the heritage, but it’s got a fascinating human history too.

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Looking North up the spit

Looking in any direction, despite the best efforts of the sea, signs of past industry and military use appear.

There are the remains of a light railway that served the peninsula, much of which is now underwater, as is the road that was passable only three years ago. There are old fortifications including First World War gun batteries.

Looking South

Looking South

To the South, as well as more fortifications, there is the lifeboat station, a small number of houses, and the monitoring station for traffic along the Humber estuary. There are also the massed thicket of bushes that prove the first landfall for thousands of migrant birds.

There has been a lighthouse here for at least 600 years, so it’s great to see the existing structure in good condition.

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The main lighthouse, built 1895 but now inoperative

The lighthouse that has been refurbished was built in 1895 and incorporated both a main light at the top of the 39m tower, and a fixed position low light too. It’s one of the tallest in the UK, and the tallest in Yorkshire.

The refurbishment is really impressive, and they are now trying to find out where the optics went after the lighthouse closed. I hope they can locate it. It’s well worth a visit if you are there, but be warned the steps are winding and steep so you have to be pretty confident of the climb.

There is a brief video, displays on the heritage, and an artist-in-residence.

You can see a near-360 degree video of the view here, and at the start you can see the remains of the old low light that was decommissioned when the larger lighthouse was built. The low light was home to breeding Peregrine Falcons this summer, and if they return next year I will be up the lighthouse again to check them out.

The video is only 40 seconds but hopefully encourages you to visit. It’s well worth it.

 

 

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I welcome thoughts, comments and questions, so please feel free to share anything at all. Thanks, David

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