Winter wildfowl and waders

One area in which I’ve been very fortunate throughout the past year is that my work means I get to drive out to green spaces when most people are locked down. It is a privilege that I’m very aware of. I hope posting on these trips isn’t annoying too many readers!

Yesterday I had to make a trip to North Cave Wetlands, an ever-developing Yorkshire Wildlife Trust nature reserve. In winter, these sites are dominated by the wintering wildfowl and waders.

A view across the wetlands

It wasn’t the best of days with grey skies and constant rain. But the birds were still out there. The dominant bird, in numbers and noise, were the lapwings. Periodically they would spook, and take to the air, whirling and calling. But here they are calm.

Lapwings. Or peewits. Or tuits. Or plovers. Or green plovers.

There were smaller numbers of snipe, redshank, and godwit too.

Spot the snipe

As well as a few mallards, the main ducks were wigeon and teal. These are a common sight on wetlands at this time of year.

Loafing ducks

There is a picnic area, currently unused for obvious reasons, where many little birds are used to cleaning up. A robin soon spotted me and began eying me hopefully.

It was soon down next to me. Given I was there to do some filming, it may also have been after stardom!

This entry was posted in Birds, Yorkshire and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Winter wildfowl and waders

  1. D Craven Snr says:

    Wish I was there

I welcome thoughts, comments and questions, so please feel free to share anything at all. Thanks, David

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